TOC

The Numerical Discourses of the Buddha

1. The Book of the Ones

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85

THE BOOK OF THE ONES

(Ekakanipāta)

8687

The Book of the Ones

I. Obsession of the Mind

1–10

II. Abandoning the Hindrances

11–20

III. Unwieldy

21–30

IV. Untamed

31–40

V. A Spike

41–50

VI. Luminous

51–60

VII. Arousal of Energy

61–70

VIII. Good Friendship

71–81

IX. Heedlessness

82–97

X. Internal

98–139

XI. Non-Dhamma

140–149

XII. Not an Offense

150–169

XIII. One Person

170–187

XIV. Foremost

188–267

88

XV. Impossible

268–295

XVI. One Thing

296–377

XVII. Qualities Engendering Confidence

378–393

XVIII. Finger Snap

394–574

XIX. Mindfulness Directed to the Body

575–615

XX. The Deathless

616–627

89

The Book of the Ones

Homage to the Blessed One, the Arahant, the Perfectly Enlightened One

I. OBSESSION OF THE MIND

1 (1)

Thus have I heard. On one occasion the Blessed One was dwelling at Sāvatthī in Jeta’s Grove, Anāthapiṇḍika’s Park. There the Blessed One addressed the bhikkhus: “Bhikkhus!”

“Venerable sir!” those bhikkhus replied. The Blessed One said this:

“Bhikkhus, I do not see even one other form that so obsesses the mind17 of a man as the form of a woman. The form of a woman obsesses the mind of a man.”

2 (2)

“Bhikkhus, I do not see even one other sound that so obsesses the mind of a man as the sound of a woman. The sound of a woman obsesses the mind of a man.”

3 (3)

“Bhikkhus, I do not see even one other odor that so obsesses the mind of a man as the odor of a woman. The odor of a woman obsesses the mind of a man.”18 [2]

4 (4)

“Bhikkhus, I do not see even one other taste that so obsesses the mind of a man as the taste of a woman. The taste of a woman obsesses the mind of a man.”19

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5 (5)

“Bhikkhus, I do not see even one other touch that so obsesses the mind of a man as the touch of a woman. The touch of a woman obsesses the mind of a man.”20

6 (6)21

“Bhikkhus, I do not see even one other form that so obsesses the mind of a woman as the form of a man. The form of a man obsesses the mind of a woman.”

7 (7)

“Bhikkhus, I do not see even one other sound that so obsesses the mind of a woman as the sound of a man. The sound of a man obsesses the mind of a woman.”

8 (8)

“Bhikkhus, I do not see even one other odor that so obsesses the mind of a woman as the odor of a man. The odor of a man obsesses the mind of a woman.”

9 (9)

“Bhikkhus, I do not see even one other taste that so obsesses the mind of a woman as the taste of a man. The taste of a man obsesses the mind of a woman.”

10 (10)

“Bhikkhus, I do not see even one other touch that so obsesses the mind of a woman as the touch of a man. The touch of a man obsesses the mind of a woman.” [3]

II. ABANDONING THE HINDRANCES22

11 (1)

“Bhikkhus, I do not see even one other thing on account of which unarisen sensual desire arises and arisen sensual desire increases and expands so much as the mark of the attractive.23 For one who attends carelessly to the mark of the attractive, unarisen sensual desire arises and arisen sensual desire increases and expands.”

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12 (2)

“Bhikkhus, I do not see even one other thing on account of which unarisen ill will arises and arisen ill will increases and expands so much as the mark of the repulsive.24 For one who attends carelessly to the mark of the repulsive, unarisen ill will arises and arisen ill will increases and expands.”

13 (3)

“Bhikkhus, I do not see even one other thing on account of which unarisen dullness and drowsiness arise and arisen dullness and drowsiness increase and expand so much as discontent, lethargy, lazy stretching, drowsiness after meals, and sluggishness of mind.25 For one with a sluggish mind, unarisen dullness and drowsiness arise and arisen dullness and drowsiness increase and expand.”

14 (4)

“Bhikkhus, I do not see even one other thing on account of which unarisen restlessness and remorse arise and arisen restlessness and remorse increase and expand so much as an unsettled mind.26 For one with an unsettled mind, unarisen restlessness and remorse arise and arisen restlessness and remorse increase and expand.” [4]

15 (5)

“Bhikkhus, I do not see even one other thing on account of which unarisen doubt arises and arisen doubt increases and expands so much as careless attention.27 For one who attends carelessly, unarisen doubt arises and arisen doubt increases and expands.”

16 (6)28

“Bhikkhus, I do not see even one other thing on account of which unarisen sensual desire does not arise and arisen sensual desire is abandoned so much as the mark of the unattractive.29 For one who attends carefully to the mark of the unattractive, unarisen sensual desire does not arise and arisen sensual desire is abandoned.”30

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17 (7)

“Bhikkhus, I do not see even one other thing on account of which unarisen ill will does not arise and arisen ill will is abandoned so much as the liberation of the mind by loving-kindness.31 For one who attends carefully to the liberation of the mind by loving-kindness, unarisen ill will does not arise and arisen ill will is abandoned.”32

18 (8)

“Bhikkhus, I do not see even one other thing on account of which unarisen dullness and drowsiness do not arise and arisen dullness and drowsiness are abandoned so much as the element of instigation, the element of persistence, the element of exertion.33 For one who has aroused energy, unarisen dullness and drowsiness do not arise and arisen dullness and drowsiness are abandoned.”34

19 (9)

“Bhikkhus, I do not see even one other thing on account of which unarisen restlessness and remorse do not arise and arisen restlessness and remorse are abandoned so much as pacification of the mind.35 For one with a pacified mind, unarisen restlessness and remorse do not arise and arisen restlessness and remorse are abandoned.”36

20 (10)

“Bhikkhus, I do not see even one other thing [5] on account of which unarisen doubt does not arise and arisen doubt is abandoned so much as careful attention.37 For one who attends carefully, unarisen doubt does not arise and arisen doubt is abandoned.”38

III. UNWIELDY

21 (1)

“Bhikkhus, I do not see even one other thing that when undeveloped is so unwieldy as the mind. An undeveloped mind is unwieldy.”

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22 (2)

“Bhikkhus, I do not see even one other thing that when developed is so wieldy as the mind. A developed mind is wieldy.”

23 (3)

“Bhikkhus, I do not see even one other thing that when undeveloped leads to such great harm as the mind. An undeveloped mind leads to great harm.”

24 (4)

“Bhikkhus, I do not see even one other thing that when developed leads to such great good as the mind. A developed mind leads to great good.”

25 (5)

“Bhikkhus, I do not see even one other thing that, when undeveloped and unmanifested,39 leads to such great harm as the mind. The mind, when undeveloped and unmanifested, leads to great harm.”

26 (6)

“Bhikkhus, I do not see even one other thing [6] that, when developed and manifested, leads to such great good as the mind. The mind, when developed and manifested, leads to great good.”

27 (7)

“Bhikkhus, I do not see even one other thing that, when undeveloped and uncultivated, leads to such great harm as the mind. The mind, when undeveloped and uncultivated, leads to great harm.”

28 (8)

“Bhikkhus, I do not see even one other thing that, when developed and cultivated, leads to such great good as the mind. The mind, when developed and cultivated, leads to great good.”

29 (9)

“Bhikkhus, I do not see even one other thing that, when undeveloped and uncultivated, brings such suffering as the 94mind. The mind, when undeveloped and uncultivated, brings suffering.”

30 (10)

“Bhikkhus, I do not see even one other thing that, when developed and cultivated, brings such happiness as the mind. The mind, when developed and cultivated, brings happiness.”

IV. UNTAMED

31 (1)

“Bhikkhus, I do not see even one other thing that when untamed leads to such great harm as the mind. An untamed mind leads to great harm.”

32 (2)

“Bhikkhus, I do not see even one other thing that when tamed leads to such great good as the mind. A tamed mind leads to great good.”

33 (3)

“Bhikkhus, I do not see even one other thing [7] that when unguarded leads to such great harm as the mind. An unguarded mind leads to great harm.”

34 (4)

“Bhikkhus, I do not see even one other thing that when guarded leads to such great good as the mind. A guarded mind leads to great good.”

35 (5)

“Bhikkhus, I do not see even one other thing that when unprotected leads to such great harm as the mind. An unprotected mind leads to great harm.”

36 (6)

“Bhikkhus, I do not see even one other thing that when protected leads to such great good as the mind. A protected mind leads to great good.”

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37 (7)

“Bhikkhus, I do not see even one other thing that when unrestrained leads to such great harm as the mind. An unrestrained mind leads to great harm.”

38 (8)

“Bhikkhus, I do not see even one other thing that when restrained leads to such great good as the mind. A restrained mind leads to great good.”

39 (9)

“Bhikkhus, I do not see even one other thing that, when untamed, unguarded, unprotected, and unrestrained, leads to such great harm as the mind. The mind, when untamed, unguarded, unprotected, and unrestrained, leads to great harm.”

40 (10)

“Bhikkhus, I do not see even one other thing that, when tamed, guarded, protected, and restrained, leads to such great good as the mind. The mind, when tamed, guarded, protected, and restrained, leads to great good.” [8]

V. A SPIKE

41 (1)

“Bhikkhus, suppose a misdirected spike of hill rice or barley were pressed by the hand or foot. It is impossible that it would pierce the hand or the foot and draw blood. For what reason? Because the spike is misdirected. So too, it is impossible that a bhikkhu with a misdirected mind would pierce ignorance, arouse true knowledge, and realize nibbāna. For what reason? Because the mind is misdirected.”

42 (2)

“Bhikkhus, suppose a well-directed spike of hill rice or barley were pressed by the hand or foot. It is possible that it would pierce the hand or the foot and draw blood. For what reason? Because the spike is well directed. So too, it is possible that a bhikkhu with a well-directed mind would pierce ignorance, 96arouse true knowledge, and realize nibbāna. For what reason? Because the mind is well directed.”

43 (3)

“Here, bhikkhus, having encompassed a mentally corrupted person’s mind with my own mind, I understand that if this person were to die at this time, he would be deposited in hell as if brought there.40 For what reason? Because his mind is corrupted.41 It is because of mental corruption that with the breakup of the body, after death, some beings here are reborn in the plane of misery, in a bad destination, in the lower world, in hell.”

44 (4)

“Here, bhikkhus, having encompassed a mentally placid person’s mind with my own mind, I understand that if [9] this person were to die at this time, he would be deposited in heaven as if brought there. For what reason? Because his mind is placid.42 It is because of mental placidity that with the breakup of the body, after death, some beings here are reborn in a good destination, in a heavenly world.”

45 (5)

“Bhikkhus, suppose there were a pool of water that was cloudy, turbid, and muddy. Then a man with good sight standing on the bank could not see shells, gravel and pebbles, and shoals of fish swimming about and resting. For what reason? Because the water is cloudy. So too, it is impossible for a bhikkhu with a cloudy mind to know his own good, the good of others, or the good of both, or to realize a superhuman distinction in knowledge and vision worthy of the noble ones. For what reason? Because his mind is cloudy.”43

46 (6)

“Bhikkhus, suppose there were a pool of water that was clear, serene, and limpid. Then a man with good sight standing on the bank could see shells, gravel and pebbles, and shoals of fish swimming about and resting. For what reason? Because the water is limpid. So too, it is possible for a bhikkhu with a limpid mind to know his own good, the good of others, and the good 97of both, and to realize a superhuman distinction in knowledge and vision worthy of the noble ones.44 For what reason? Because his mind is limpid.”

47 (7)

“Bhikkhus, just as sandalwood is declared to be the best of trees with respect to malleability and wieldiness, so too I do not see even one other thing that, when developed and cultivated, is so malleable and wieldy as the mind. A developed and cultivated mind is malleable and wieldy.” [10]

48 (8)

“Bhikkhus, I do not see even one other thing that changes so quickly as the mind.45 It is not easy to give a simile for how quickly the mind changes.”

49 (9)

“Luminous, bhikkhus, is this mind, but it is defiled by adventitious defilements.”46

50 (10)

“Luminous, bhikkhus, is this mind, and it is freed from adventitious defilements.”

VI. LUMINOUS

51 (1)

“Luminous, bhikkhus, is this mind, but it is defiled by adventitious defilements. The uninstructed worldling does not understand this as it really is; therefore I say that for the uninstructed worldling there is no development of the mind.”47

52 (2)

“Luminous, bhikkhus, is this mind, and it is freed from adventitious defilements. The instructed noble disciple understands this as it really is; therefore I say that for the instructed noble disciple there is development of the mind.”48

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53 (3)

“Bhikkhus, if for just the time of a finger snap a bhikkhu pursues a mind of loving-kindness, he is called a bhikkhu who is not devoid of jhāna, who acts upon the teaching of the Teacher, who responds to his advice, and who does not eat the country’s almsfood in vain.49 How much more, then, those who cultivate it!”

54 (4)

“Bhikkhus, if for just the time of a finger snap a bhikkhu develops a mind of loving-kindness, he is called a bhikkhu who is not devoid of jhāna, who acts upon the teaching of the Teacher, who responds to his advice, and who does not eat the country’s almsfood in vain. How much more, then, those who cultivate it!” [11]

55 (5)

“Bhikkhus, if for just the time of a finger snap a bhikkhu attends to a mind of loving-kindness, he is called a bhikkhu who is not devoid of jhāna, who acts upon the teaching of the Teacher, who responds to his advice, and who does not eat the country’s almsfood in vain. How much more, then, those who cultivate it!”

56 (6)

“Bhikkhus, whatever qualities are unwholesome, partake of the unwholesome, and pertain to the unwholesome, all have the mind as their forerunner.50 Mind arises first followed by the unwholesome qualities.”

57 (7)

“Bhikkhus, whatever qualities are wholesome, partake of the wholesome, and pertain to the wholesome, all have the mind as their forerunner. Mind arises first followed by the wholesome qualities.”

58 (8)

“Bhikkhus, I do not see a single thing that so causes unarisen unwholesome qualities to arise and arisen wholesome qualities to decline as heedlessness.51 For one who is heedless, unarisen 99unwholesome qualities arise and arisen wholesome qualities decline.”

59 (9)

“Bhikkhus, I do not see a single thing that so causes unarisen wholesome qualities to arise and arisen unwholesome qualities to decline as heedfulness. For one who is heedful, unarisen wholesome qualities arise and arisen unwholesome qualities decline.”

60 (10)

“Bhikkhus, I do not see a single thing that so causes unarisen unwholesome qualities to arise and arisen wholesome qualities to decline as laziness. For one who is lazy, unarisen unwholesome qualities arise and arisen wholesome qualities decline.” [12]

VII. AROUSAL OF ENERGY

61 (1)

“Bhikkhus, I do not see even a single thing that so causes unarisen wholesome qualities to arise and arisen unwholesome qualities to decline as arousal of energy. For one who has aroused energy, unarisen wholesome qualities arise and arisen unwholesome qualities decline.”

62 (2)

“Bhikkhus, I do not see even a single thing that so causes unarisen unwholesome qualities to arise and arisen wholesome qualities to decline as strong desire.52 For one with strong desire, unarisen unwholesome qualities arise and arisen wholesome qualities decline.”

63 (3)

“Bhikkhus, I do not see even a single thing that so causes unarisen wholesome qualities to arise and arisen unwholesome qualities to decline as fewness of desires.53 For one with few desires, unarisen wholesome qualities arise and arisen unwholesome qualities decline.”

100

64 (4)

“Bhikkhus, I do not see even a single thing that so causes unarisen unwholesome qualities to arise and arisen wholesome qualities to decline as non-contentment.54 For one who is not content, unarisen unwholesome qualities arise and arisen wholesome qualities decline.”

65 (5)

“Bhikkhus, I do not see even a single thing that so causes unarisen wholesome qualities to arise and arisen unwholesome qualities to decline as contentment.55 For one who is content, unarisen wholesome qualities arise and arisen unwholesome qualities decline.” [13]

66 (6)

“Bhikkhus, I do not see even a single thing that so causes unarisen unwholesome qualities to arise and arisen wholesome qualities to decline as careless attention. For one who attends carelessly, unarisen unwholesome qualities arise and arisen wholesome qualities decline.”

67 (7)

“Bhikkhus, I do not see even a single thing that so causes unarisen wholesome qualities to arise and arisen unwholesome qualities to decline as careful attention. For one who attends carefully, unarisen wholesome qualities arise and arisen unwholesome qualities decline.”

68 (8)

“Bhikkhus, I do not see even a single thing that so causes unarisen unwholesome qualities to arise and arisen wholesome qualities to decline as lack of clear comprehension. For one who does not clearly comprehend, unarisen unwholesome qualities arise and arisen wholesome qualities decline.”

69 (9)

“Bhikkhus, I do not see even a single thing that so causes unarisen wholesome qualities to arise and arisen unwholesome qualities to decline as clear comprehension.56 For one who clearly comprehends, unarisen wholesome qualities arise and arisen unwholesome qualities decline.”

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70 (10)

“Bhikkhus, I do not see even a single thing that so causes unarisen unwholesome qualities to arise and arisen wholesome qualities to decline as bad friendship. For one with bad friends, unarisen unwholesome qualities arise and arisen wholesome qualities decline.” [14]

VIII. GOOD FRIENDSHIP

71 (1)

“Bhikkhus, I do not see even a single thing that so causes unarisen wholesome qualities to arise and arisen unwholesome qualities to decline as good friendship. For one with good friends, unarisen wholesome qualities arise and arisen unwholesome qualities decline.”57

72 (2)

“Bhikkhus, I do not see even a single thing that so causes unarisen unwholesome qualities to arise and arisen wholesome qualities to decline as the pursuit of unwholesome qualities and the non-pursuit of wholesome qualities. Through the pursuit of unwholesome qualities and the non-pursuit of wholesome qualities, unarisen unwholesome qualities arise and arisen wholesome qualities decline...

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